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Marco Krumbuegel Phones & Addresses

  • 3865 Aragon Ln, San Ramon, CA 94583
  • Alamo, CA
  • Danville, CA

Work

Company: Illumina Jun 2008 to Sep 2013 Address: Hayward, CA Position: Staff engineer - development

Education

School / High School: University of California, Santa Cruz 2009 to 2011

Awards

Feodor-Lynen Scholarship of the Alexande...

Industries

Biotechnology

Resumes

Resumes

Marco Krumbuegel Photo 1

Staff Engineer - Development At Illumina

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Position:
Staff Engineer - Development at Illumina
Location:
San Francisco Bay Area
Industry:
Biotechnology
Work:
Illumina - Hayward, CA since Jun 2008
Staff Engineer - Development

KLA-Tencor - Milpitas, CA Sep 1999 - Jun 2008
Systems Design Engineer

HMT Technology - Fremont, CA Jul 1997 - Sep 1999
R&D Scientist

Sandia National Laboratories - Livermore, CA Jun 1995 - Jul 1997
Visiting Researcher

University of Potsdam Oct 1994 - May 1995
Research Associate
Education:
University of California, Santa Cruz 2009 - 2011
University of California, Santa Cruz 2000 - 2001
University of California, Santa Cruz 1999 - 2001
Technische Universit├Ąt Berlin 1990 - 1993
Technische Universit├Ąt Berlin 1984 - 1990
Honor & Awards:
Feodor-Lynen Scholarship of the Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation (1995-1997); US Patents #5,978,091, #6,008,899

Publications

Us Patents

Laser-Bump Sensor Method And Apparatus

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US Patent:
59780916, Nov 2, 1999
Filed:
Jun 26, 1998
Appl. No.:
9/105695
Inventors:
Peter C. Jann - Santa Clara CA
Marco A. Krumbuegel - Danville CA
Reginald Lee - Alameda CA
Ming M. Yang - San Jose CA
Assignee:
HMT Technology Corporation - Fremont CA
International Classification:
G01B 1124
G01B 1130
G01N 2100
G01N 2188
US Classification:
356376
Abstract:
An apparatus for measuring the height and diameter of laser-zone texture bumps on a rigid magnetic disk substrate is disclosed. The apparatus has a disk holder for supporting and rotating the substrate, and an optical beam-source assembly for directing a focused laser beam on the substrate, and for shifting the position of the beam's illumination spot on the substrate in a tracking (radial) direction. An optical detection assembly in the apparatus measures the deflection of the laser beam due to specular reflection of the beam by laser-zone texture bumps, as a function of time, in both scanning (circumferential) and tracking directions. A computational device in the apparatus functions to (i) calculate scanning and tracking deflection values which characterize beam deflections in the scanning and tracking directions, respectively, for a texture bump passing through the illumination spot produced by the beam on the substrate, (ii) select for bump-height analysis, those texture bumps whose scanning deflection values are above a selected threshold value and whose tracking deflection values are below a selected threshold value, indicative of a condition in which the selected textured bumps are each in focus and centered within said illumination spot, and (iii) determine the texture bump heights and diameters of the selected bumps from the beam deflections in the scanning direction. Also disclosed is a method by which the apparatus measures the light power which is scattered by the of laser-zone texture bumps on a rigid magnetic disk substrate.

Apparatus And Method For Optical Pulse Measurement

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US Patent:
60088990, Dec 28, 1999
Filed:
Jun 18, 1997
Appl. No.:
8/878301
Inventors:
Rick P. Trebino - Livermore CA
Thomas Tsang - Brooklyn NY
David N. Fittinghoff - San Diego CA
John N. Sweetser - Livermore CA
Marco A. Krumbuegel - Danville CA
Assignee:
Sandia Corporation - Livermore CA
International Classification:
G01B 902
US Classification:
356345
Abstract:
Practical third-order frequency-resolved optical grating (FROG) techniques for characterization of ultrashort optical pulses are disclosed. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of single and/or weak optical pulses having pulse durations in the picosecond and subpicosecond regime. The relative quantum inefficiency of third-order nonlinear optical effects is compensated for through i) use of phase-matched transient grating beam geometry to maximize interaction length, and ii) use of interface-enhanced third-harmonic generation.
Marco A Krumbuegel from San Ramon, CA, age ~56 Get Report